Culinary Odyssey

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The Future of Food is one of those topics that’s been getting a lot of attention of late. From research institutions to trend analysts, sociologists, and good old fashioned futurists, what we’ll be eating in the face of indefatigable population growth, resource diminishment and continued bio-tech developments is a topic hot enough to, well, eat.

So when Messrs Bompas and Parr – ‘Jellymongers’ turned enthused food creatives – deigned to show us the gastro-future, obviously we had to take a look. And a few photos.

On the culinary front, highlights of the the evening’s experimentations included a barrage of insectoid references (which reminds us: make sure you’ve checked out Ento, a beautifully-designed if stomach-warbling taste of the future if you haven’t already), levitating meringues (apparently powered by authentic 1950s propulsion/repulsion technology) and saliva-activated phosphorescent lollipops (and yes: it is difficult to concentrate when someone is talking to you with their mouth vibrantly a-glow).

And of course there was also plenty of booze too. Not suggesting that we wouldn’t have been there without a beverage in our hand. But. Well. What’s the future without a dram or two…?

The alco-spotlight was surely taken by the self-serving mechanical pouring arm (which, as our ECC bartender du jour quipped, will even cut you off when you’ve had too many), fully laden with a self-replenishing, variation of an Aviation (which is a lot harder to say after you’ve sampled a few). But props, as we hear the kids call them these days, must also go to the bottle-served, liquor-tinged stimulant that was the Pan-Galactic Gargle Blaster (an ode to Douglas Adams) and of course the nitrous-packed, Mr Whippy-ish take on a Piña Colada.

At the risk of being overly self-referential, the future might actually be so bright that sunglasses shall indeed become prescriptive. If only to shield our eyes from our own blindingly-bright, insect-nourished, phosphorescently glowing oral cavities.

C.f.: Bompas & Parr